Use or lose.

Use or lose.

 

What would you do to save a life?

 

Would you listen to that little voice in your head? Would you feel those tingly sensations in your stomach? Would you notice that something didn’t feel quite right at the moment? Would you let that nagging feeling linger and do something about it? Or simply ignore it.

 

Would you ignore it if a life depended on it?

 

Three days ago, I was hanging out at the last pool party of the season with my family. Across the pool, I saw another mom friend. I was excited to see my friend Michelle because both our boys are in kinder this year at the same school

 

As we spoke of making time together and having “mommy juice.” The next thing I said was, “Yes, let’s get together so we can figure out to save the world.” Just as we laughed, a tiny human ran by us. She had tears in her wide blue eyes and a look of panic. My friend Michelle and her mama bear instincts took over. She scooped up the little girl. I asked the little one’s name. She only let her tears and coughing talk.

 

I ran to the cabana to find someone to get on the PA system. We could only refer to her as the little girl with “a polka dot suit.” Michelle and I looked closer at the little girl; mucus was coming out quickly from her button nose. She didn’t seem right and she put the child down and the child instantly projectile vomited on the wet cement. My friend wrapped up the little girl with a towel in her arms. We both looked at each other. We could hear the voices in our heads. “She fell into the water.”

 

Thankfully someone to made another announcement. This one was louder. When I turned around to check on our sweet baby, she was lethargic and was falling asleep in my friend’s arms. My chest constricted. It started to hurt. The voices in my head started yelling. “Water in lungs. Water in lungs. Water in lungs.”

The next words I heard were “secondary drowning.” This unfortunate incident can happen 1-24 hours later. Water enters the lungs and can cause pulmonary edema. This fluid causes difficulty with breathing and death. The crazy thing is how did I know this? I’m not a doctor. Maybe I heard it on Oprah or Dr. Oz. Wherever I heard it from, it was coming on full surround sound in my entire being.

 

The mom came running over. We told the mom we believed her baby fell in the pool, even though we had no evidence of it at the time. I told the mom she should take her daughter to a doctor. The mom profusely thanked us and took her daughter to a bench to get her other older child.

 

At this time, I could have turned away. Most folks did. Everyone thought the girl had just gotten lost. And now the toddler was reunited with her mama. End of story. Happy ending.

But my chest still felt constricted. I couldn’t stop staring in the direction at the family of girls. Everything in my body said, “Don’t leave the mom. Help her. Tell her. Water in lungs. Water in lungs. Water in lungs.”

 

My husband found me, wondering where I had been. Then he noticed “the look.” It’s my crazy I’m-going-to-chase-down-a-complete-stranger-because-it’s-urgent look.” I told him I needed to help the mom get to her car.

 

I pleaded with the mom to make sure that she would take her daughter to the doctor. I told her about my concern that her child had water in her lungs. The projectile vomiting and lethargy also set off loud bells in me internally. I offered to walk with the mom and her 6-year-old daughter to their car. She allowed me. As a complete stranger, I was grateful. I carried their bags. I strapped the older one in with her seatbelt, while mom strapped the two-year-old baby in the car. I told the mom I’d find her on Facebook since I didn’t have my phone with me.

 

The mom quickly drove off. For a minute, I felt like a crazy person. Didn’t anybody else see what I was seeing? Weren’t they sensing what I was sensing? Or maybe I was one taco short of a combo platter. Sure, I could have been wrong, but there was another force that was guiding me, and I listened and acted upon that information.

 

An hour later, I found the mom on Facebook. I asked her how her toddler was doing. The mom wrote me back saying, “She was doing well but the doctor was concerned because she had “fluid in the lungs” and she needed to stay overnight at the hospital. They also were concerned about the possible development of pneumonia.

 

I could finally breathe, hearing that the little girl was in good hands. I called my superhero mama friend, and we were in simply in awe how everything came together so Divinely perfect when we both listened to our intuition.

 

Coming down from the adrenaline of the evening, the next day I became curious. I thought what was the price I could have paid if I didn’t listen to my gut, my intuition. What would have happened if I didn’t urge the mom to get help and she just put her baby down to sleep for the night? The tightness in my chest returned. It felt like death.

 

I wondered if we all have intuition as a part of our natural biological and spiritual connection with the Universe, why do some people sense it more than others? Why do some of us act on intuition and others don’t? If we don’t use it, do we lose it? And most importantly, how can we strengthen it to get all we desire in life, like abundance, love, and happiness?

 

Then my intuition told me. It roared that if you don’t use it, you simply miss out on all the signs and signals the world is giving you. Ignoring your intuition could create both inner and outer turmoil. If you want to know how to use it, then do two things. Shut your mouth and be still, just for a second. My intuition knows I have a big mouth. Next, I saw my bathroom in my mind. Never mind that it needed cleaning, I saw an image of my sink that was dripping and then it made perfect sense to me.

 

Your intuition comes as a quiet drip. And you need to be quiet enough to hear it away from all the distractions in your life. Think of your bathroom sink at home. You may hear a drip, and you might not be sure why it’s leaking. You just know something seems different. At this moment, you have created awareness. The next day, you are not only able to detect the sound, but you can tell that the faucet is dripping louder and more quickly. By the end of the 3rd day or a week, all you notice is the loud, continuous dripping and you finally take action to either fix it yourself or call a plumber.

 

Your intuition works in the same fashion. You might get a hunch to take a different road to work. This sensation pays off because you avoid a traffic accident you hear about later.

 

You go home and even before you decide to eat leftovers and open the fridge, something tells you the food has gone rancid. You open the fridge and see your entrée fermenting in grossness.

 

You’re about to park in a parking lot space, and something tells you to find another space closer to the store where it’s well lit, and you avoid a robbery.

 

You feel your arm go numb. And you’re not leaning on it. You take two aspirins and call 911. You prevent a heart attack.

 

These are all patterns of insight. The more you slow down even a little to create awareness of intuition and use it on a regular basis, you begin to notice all the possibilities in your life. Aren’t your greatest desires in this lifetime worth going after with everything thing you have? And surprisingly enough, sometimes it’s the smallest and quietest voices inside yourself or tingling feelings that help you achieve them

 

Today, use your gift of intuition. Use the little voices, the hunches, and the signs of expanding or tightening in the chest, the tingly feelings, and goose bumps. You may just save a life today. And knowing this can help you breathe easier in the deep water of the tides of life. Namaste.

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